My glamorous life

I’m sitting here on my terrace just finishing up my breakfast of a super ripe (and very messy) peach. The sun has been up for an hour, my newly implemented workout is complete (owie) and the buzz of the Greenway is getting louder as people head to the office. For 23 years I was one of them. I woke to the alarm, sat in traffic on the Long Island Expressway, and put in long hours managing networks and writing programs. Some days it was great, some days it wasn’t. But it was always challenging and it was always part of me. As were the people I saw every day.

I don’t really consider myself a super social person. There I said it. I am a textbook introvert.

When I first faced the opportunity of working from home, I thought it would be perfect for me! No alarm clocks, no schedule, no traffic, and let’s face it, not much face time…just me and the wide, wide Internet. It’s very easy to be a social butterfly from a keyboard! Right? In some ways, yes. It’s very easy to throw something out there and pretend that no one really sees it anyway. Sometimes we forget that the are living, breathing, feeling people on the other end of a bunch of typed up babbling. People that are really nice to connect with! Face to face. Over lunch, or shopping, or even during a stressful work day. I have to admit that sometimes I miss it. Without a little structure in my life, I’m very easily distracted, misdirected, swayed into “I can just put that off until tomorrow”. Working from home has proven itself to be more of a challenge than I could have imagined! My scattered mind loves the freedom of jumping from task to task but the practical part of me definitely struggles to keep some order – wake up, exercise, answer those emails and phone calls – yes, Talk. To. People. – (sneak in an hour to watch the latest episode of True Blood), write that blog post, and for goodness sake, organize your accounting!

Fuzzypants is on my mind 24/7. It truly is. How can I be a better photographer? What can I do to make my clients know how special they are? Do I really need that new camera? How much time can I donate to shelter work this month? Should I add this new product to my catalog? Sometimes the questions zoom around at such a frantic pace that I really have to step back, take a deep breath, get out of my pajamas, and do some work (or play) outside my little office. I think that is what I forget. It’s proven difficult to get past the idea that not being on a set schedule or having a building to go to very day means I don’t really have a job. I do. It’s exactly what I want to be doing. But even so, having that little to-do Post-It on my desk never hurts. Right now it would say, “Go unlock the front door and put a foot outside.”

What would you like best about working from home? What would be your challenges?

Justine - June 29, 2012 - 8:50 PM

Good one. What I would like? hmm. The privacy to make or take a phone call, listen to whatever music moved me. Scratch. Having a dog on my feet (or two). I’ve worked from home a few days a week before and since I’m a pretty good multitasker, I could do support calls, the dishes and the laundry and vacuum. I spent much less of my weekends doing housework.
The challenges? The fact that Steven and I would both be together all day and all night. We did that before when we worked together and it didn’t go well. If I was actually doing art full time, and not my “day job” the challenge would be an uninterrupted space. Where cats wouldn’t be investigating the turpentine or the paints. I don’t have a studio space in our house that is truly pet free. I LOVE our guys, but painting and pets don’t mix well.

Paulette Clay - July 21, 2012 - 3:25 PM

Just saw the Pet Show and need to find out how to get the magazine.

Carina Thornton - July 25, 2012 - 6:56 PM

Hi Paulette! You can subscribe to the magazine by visiting this link: http://www.thevirginia-marylanddog.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=339

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